The female external genitalia (or vulva/pudendum) is composed of a vestibule of vagina and its surrounding structures like mons pubis, labia majora, labia minora, clitoris, and pair of greater vestibular glands.

Vestibule of Vagina

It’s an elliptical space between the labia minora. It includes urethral orifice anteriorly and vaginal orifice (vaginal introitus) posteriorly. The latter is incompletely covered by hymen. Along with the above openings, it also includes the openings of greater vestibular glands (of Bartholin), lesser vestibular glands, and paraurethral glands (of Skene).

Mons Pubis

It’s an elevation of skin over the pubic symphysis with underlying thick fat pad. The anterior ends of 2 labia major link on its sides. It acts as shock absorber during coitus.

Labia Majora

All these are folds of hairy skin with underlying fat pads which unify anteriorly to create the mons pubis.

Labia Minora

All these are 2 thin folds of hairless skin found medial to the labia majora. They enclose the vestibule of vagina. 2 labia minora are continuous anteriorly with the prepuce and frenulum of the clitoris; and posteriorly with the fourchette which attach the labia minora together with the vaginal orifice.

Clitoris

It’s a small erectile structure (less than 2 cm in length) found into the anterior margin of the vestibule of vagina. It’s homologous of the penis in male but will not transmit urethra. The body of clitoris is composed by 2 corpora cavernosa that are constant with the crura. The glans of clitoris is composed by the fusion of anterior ends of the bulbs of the vestibule. There’s no corpus spongiosum in the body of clitoris. The corpus spongiosum in female is symbolized by bulbs of the vestibule and glans of clitoris.

The clitoris is richly innervated by sensory receptors which function to begin and intensify sexual pleasure.